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Thread: What is Dhamma?

  1. #11
    Administrator/ 5 Precept Keeper Senior Member Jerrod Lopes's Avatar
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    Please disregard all of my posts on this thread.

    Thank you.

  2. #12
    Hi, Mara,
    According to my understanding of this article, you are your world the Samsara, therefore, all you need to go beyond this world can only be found within this world of yours. You have no access to others worlds nor do they have to yours. Hence “seek your Dhamma within” said Siddhartha.
    I am sorry you seem to have misunderstood me. I am not asking anyone to prove or disprove anything. This article is an invitation to everyone to share their views on the subject matter for the benefit of all readers who can then form their own opinion. Some may agree and others may not and that’s the way it is. There is absolutely nothing one can do about it, not even Siddhartha.

    Best regards. Bradley

  3. #13
    Hi Mara,
    According to my understanding of this article, you are your world the Samsara, therefore, all you need to go beyond this world can only be found within this world of yours. You have no access to others worlds nor do they have to yours. Hence “seek your Dhamma within” said Siddhartha.
    I am sorry you seem to have misunderstood me. I am not asking anyone to prove or disprove anything. This article is an invitation to everyone to share their views on the subject matter for the benefit of all readers who can then form their own opinion. Some may agree and others may not and that’s the way it is. There is absolutely nothing one can do about it, not even Siddhartha.

    Best regards. Bradley

  4. #14
    Senior Member Mara Pacers's Avatar
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    Hi again Bradley,

    I personally wouldn't call your OP an article, but an opinion. I am curious why you put so much faith in it, and choose to discount the Buddahs words and Ajahn Brahm's exposition of them. I don't need a response to this question, but it might be something you choose to ask yourself.

    with Metta

    M

  5. #15
    Thank you for your efforts to spark discussion, which you have.
    Reading the replies, one can see how different perspectives are brought forward..
    Some agreeing...
    Some protecting their perspectives..
    While I feel we have a vast space inside of us...with knowledge ....I guess what I am trying to say is....when I first began to learn about Buddhism, it seemed so very familiar to me from deep inside. This made absorbing/remembering the teachings I heard feel natural....but this started from listening to others discuss the Buddhist teachings. Maybe not always in full agreement..finding my Middle way....living the teachings and incorporating/practicing the values and sharing with others on the path.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #16
    I didn’t think that photo was going to come along with the reply! Unexpected...I just think it is humorous and wondering what a caption could be for the photo

  7. #17
    Administrator/ 5 Precept Keeper Senior Member Jerrod Lopes's Avatar
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    It looks like what happens to a monk or nun who eats too much. It's a stuffed monastic!

  8. #18
    Senior Member Mara Pacers's Avatar
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    One of the things that I have found so useful from the Buddhas teachings is the constant inner questioning to test the 'truth' of different perspectives. The Buddha was very clear with regards to being aware of who and what you choose to follow or believe etc. See the Kalama Sutta.

    The 4 specific sutta/deeper Dhamma classes/talks by Ajahn Brahm, that I referred to provide exceptionally clear analysis, with a wide variety of examples and supporting scholarship. To place this side-by-side with a different point of view allows one to skillfully investigate ones own belief systems. Why is it that one resonates more or less... Is this related to a set of beliefs or preferences inherent in this life so far. Are there any clues that can lead us to see parts of self view or identity that may be acting as fetters?

    Each of us is subject to our own Karma, and I would never tell someone what to believe. However, the opportunity to have input from others to help stimulate and untangle our experiences is a very valuable thing. I am no Buddhist scholar, but I can appreciate the scholarship that has/is occuring. Therefore, statements such as this one from the OP, leave me sceptical.

    "Siddhartha was emphatic when he called on the seeker not to rely on hearsay or second-hand knowledge acquired from teachers, preachers and so-called ‘sacred’ books and ‘Suttas’ for they are empty rhetoric that has no bearing on the unique ‘Way’ of a seeker."

    This statement, contains various components that make me question the intent and understanding of the author. The Buddha (after Sidharta had attained full enlightenment), said that one should not rely on any other source alone, but that right effort and right view involves questioning what they say, not just accepting it because of the Status of the person saying it, or of how appealing one finds the view. In fact he emphatically stated that individuals should look to mix with "the noble ones", those who had right understanding and right intention.

    Buddha also NEVER said the Suttas are empty rhetoric. In fact, he asserts that he has shared all the information needed for humans to be able to follow the Noble 8 Fold path and to reach enlightenment. The Pali canon is not like the bible, most of it is verifiably the Buddhas actual words and teachings.
    I could go through each sentence in the O P, but I don't believe that is useful.

    Rather I urge each person to evaluate what is heard, to question, to contemplate etc. For myself I find that there are numerous aspects presented by the author, that when I ask the question, does it help me progress along the path, the answer is no. This for is the litmus test!

    The "Word of the Buddha" series that I mentioned, is a wholly new translation, that answers Bradley's questions far better than I ever could. I sincerely encourage anyone who wants to understand Dhamma and the Buddhas message to us, to have a look at this resource. And then, of course, look internally and ask yourself all the same questions that I put above.

    May all beings be free from suffering.

    Mara

  9. #19
    Senior Member Mara Pacers's Avatar
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    PS. The monastics will soon be finishing the rains retreat. It would be interesting to see any responses from them.

  10. #20
    That one meal a day must be a big one! The Buddha doll reminds me of our Buddha nature we all have but we are stuck with that pin...wanty.....needy....

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