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Thread: What is Dhamma?

  1. #1

    What is Dhamma?

    Hi everyone, I am forwarding the following article with the intention of initiating a meaningful dialog. Can I have your thoughts pls.

    IS BUDDHISM THE ‘WORD OF SIDDHARTHA’?

    What is ‘Dhamma’?


    Contrary to accepted belief, Siddhartha who totally rejected blind faith is not the founder of Buddhism the religion. He was the discoverer of the ‘Dhamma’ the ‘Dependent Origination’ the ‘Cosmic Law’ a ‘something never heard before’ the creator of both animate and inanimate in the universe and a ‘Way’ to neutralize this process that creates the illusion of ‘self’. They are one and the same, two sides of the same coin.

    To the Buddhist, the ‘Dhamma’ is teachings of the Buddha. However, to the seeker the ‘Dhamma’ is the creator of his thought process hence it is unique beyond the comprehension of others and cannot be discoursed or found in so-called ‘sacred books’. He knows it can only be experienced within.

    All religions including Buddhism are concepts of ignorant human mind. Hence it is imperative they constantly modify their teachings to keep abreast with the ever-evolving ways, beliefs, and cultures of the world for their survival, lest they become obsolete. The emergence of various Buddhist traditions over time all claiming to represent the original message of Siddhartha clearly reflects this trend. With the creation of Buddhism after passing away of Siddhartha, his original message was lost to the ignorant world of religions where greed, lies and deception are the norms. However, the ‘Dhamma’ is timeless and boundless and will always remain as fresh today as it was revealed over 2,600 years ago.

    Siddhartha was emphatic when he called on the seeker not to rely on hearsay or second-hand knowledge acquired from teachers, preachers and so-called ‘sacred’ books and ‘Suttas’ for they are empty rhetoric that has no bearing on the unique ‘Way’ of a seeker. Hence, to experience the true nature of his ‘Dhamma’ the source of his thought process that creates the illusion of ‘I’, Siddhartha revealed the ‘Sattipatthana’ i.e. the body, feeling and ‘Chitta’ are just ‘Dhamma’ an empty process arising and passing away dependent on conditions, devoid of a ‘self’. With this realization gained through his own experience, the seeker must guide his dualistic thought process on the ‘Middle Way’ with the ‘Mental Factor’ to conquer his creator. His ‘Dhamma’ the world of duality thus neutralized creates no more. The end of all formations. The Buddhist concept of ‘suffering and ‘way out of suffering’ is a delusion for ‘Samsara’ is neither suffering nor bliss but a duality. Hence, Siddhartha for the first-time freed man from the shackles of religions and their ‘holy men’ who held sway over their unsuspecting believers using the ‘fear factor’ to enslave them.

    Siddhartha neutralized his ‘Dhamma’ but not that of others. He squarely placed that responsibility on us when he said, “I am not a savior, find your own way” and revealed the set of tools that is to be found within the seeker, to seek his own ‘Middle Process’. It is the ‘Mental Factor’ the concomitance ‘Sila, Samadhi, Wisdom. Hence the Middle Process’ together with the ‘Mental Factor’ comprise the one and the only ‘Way’ to deliverance ever revealed.

    The ‘Dhamma’ can only be sought within. It reveals itself only to the seeker as it arises and passes away dependent on conditions. Hence to neutralize this dualistic Dhamma, one has to transform his whole life into a process of discovery being aware of his ‘Chitta’ every moment with the ‘Mental Factor’ to guide it on the ‘Middle process’. It is this unique technique revealed by Siddhartha that leads the seeker to his creator. It is not about ‘doing’ meditation sitting or walking but ‘living in meditation’ every moment. Hence such ascetic and religious meditation practices as Jhana, Vipassana, Metta etc. that are an integral part of Buddhism and other Indian religions are irrelevant to the seeker. It is a personal journey into yourself that leads you to the realization the ‘self’ is no more than an illusion.

    'Your ‘Way’ is within. It is your very own’.

  2. #2
    Administrator/ 5 Precept Keeper Senior Member Jerrod Lopes's Avatar
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    Bradley,

    Nothing new from me, but I will restate my view on this article for the consideration of those who may be new to this discussion.

    The writer is misguided and mistaken on the most basic fundamentals. This is why I have been quite critical of your articles thus far. While the article is not incorrect in some observations regarding a majority of human behavior, it misses the mark entirely regarding dhamma, what IT is and its nature. Seeing as the article is an exposition of dhamma, and the view of dhamma as the Buddha taught, the article fails completely. Is it perhaps that this article is translated from another, original language?

  3. #3
    Administrator/ 5 Precept Keeper Senior Member Jerrod Lopes's Avatar
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    Bradley,

    Nothing new from me, but I will restate my view on this article for the consideration of those who may be new to this discussion.

    The writer is misguided and mistaken on the most basic fundamentals. This is why I have been quite critical of your articles thus far. While the article is not incorrect in some observations regarding a majority of human behavior, it misses the mark entirely regarding dhamma, what IT is and its nature. Seeing as the article is an exposition of dhamma, and the view of dhamma as the Buddha taught, the article fails completely. Is it perhaps that this article is translated from another, original language?

  4. #4
    If you have to ask what jazz is, you will never know.

    - Louis Armstrong
    “Here are roots of trees, here are empty huts – practice jhana! Do not be negligent! Do not regret it later!” - Buddha

  5. #5
    Senior Member Mara Pacers's Avatar
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    Dear Bradley,
    I have spent the night thinking about how best to respond.

    I sincerely urge you to listen or watch Ajahn Brahms set of Dhamma teachings called Word of the Buddha. It is in 6 parts, and is the most clear summary. When you have listened to them, (at least the first 4 in the series) and have a good grasp, then we can discuss the article in an informed manner. If you are serious, this study is a very small investment to make.

    With Metta

    Mara

  6. #6
    Hi Ed.
    You really nailed it short and sweet.
    I am in total agreement with you. Yes, one may read about jazz, listen to talks about jazz and even meditate on jazz but you will never ever know what jazz is. The only way to know jazz is to listen to it to experience it. Only then you will know what Jazz is. Regards. Bradley

  7. #7
    Hi Mara,
    Thank you so much for the information. I am a regular follower of AB’s talks and have read many of his books. Hence, I am fairly conversant with his teachings. Now that you have read the article “What is Dhamma’, I am really keen to discuss with you it’s pros and cons against AB’s talks. Believe me, I am very serious about it. Since I keep an open mind, maybe it would help me widen my sphere of understanding of Dhamma.
    Thank you once again. Best regards. Bradley

  8. #8
    Administrator/ 5 Precept Keeper Senior Member Jerrod Lopes's Avatar
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    Bradley,

    I would take your assessment of Ed's comment one step further to say that if you haven't played jazz, you won't know what jazz is. Though I will say also that jazz in even more ways than this is an excellent example being so much like dhamma. Funny thing though. Most jazz musicians and Buddhists I've known are so hung up on the rules and techniques that they miss the point; there are very few rules and prescribed techniques in pure dhamma or jazz.

  9. #9
    Administrator/ 5 Precept Keeper Senior Member Jerrod Lopes's Avatar
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    Bradley,

    I would take your assessment of Ed's comment one step further to say that if you haven't played jazz, you won't know what jazz is. Though I will say also that jazz in even more ways than this is an excellent example being so much like dhamma. Funny thing though. Most jazz musicians and Buddhists I've known are so hung up on the rules and techniques that they miss the point; there are very few rules and prescribed techniques in pure dhamma or jazz.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Mara Pacers's Avatar
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    Bradley, from my perspective, I don't think further discussion about the 'article' you posted would be a fruitful pursuit.

    You seem to be saying that everything you need is within, yet you are asking us to somehow prove or disprove the views in the article. I have directed you to a resource that I think would give you the answers you are asking for. Yet you haven't even looked - just making assumptions. This Dhamma teaching is completely different from AB's books, which I have read. It is also substantially different from the Dhamma talks and is specifically targeted at issues you are raising.

    Without a meaningful framework and specific comparisons there isn't much chance for a useful discussion. You say blue, I say green and Joe Blow says red...
    Do what you will, think what you will - you have the all the resources you need, but you have to use them skillfully.

    All the best

    Mara

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