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Thread: Meditation in the Way of a seeker of Dhamma

  1. #1

    Meditation in the Way of a seeker of Dhamma

    Hi everyone, I thought of submitting the following article to the forum to share it with those who are interested in meditation to start a dialog for the benefit of all. Thanks. Bradley.

    IS BUDDHISM THE ‘WORD OF SIDDHARTHA’?

    MEDITATION IN THE ‘WAY OF A SEEKER OF DHAMMA’.

    When we delve into the subject of meditation the first impression that comes to our mind is the body posture commonly associated with it viz. sitting and walking. In fact, they were the only methods existed and practiced by ascetics, men of religions, yogis and mystics at the time of Siddhartha, in India.

    This tradition has remained virtually unchanged ever since. It was no doubt based on the blind belief the ‘Chitta’ the thought process originated in the brain an organ a part of the body. Hence the presumption, a tranquil body was the precursor to a tranquil mind. Therefore, the strategy obviously was to silence the body to silence the brain. Hence, the body posture along with a quiet and peaceful location to calm the senses became the basic requirement for meditation in religions and ascetic practices. What is achieved through this practice is auto-hypnotism. It has no useful purpose whatsoever to a seeker of Dhamma, a worthless exercise akin to taking ‘painkillers’, a brief period of respite a self-deception. The inherent nature of the mind is duality, therefore it cannot be silenced or purified but can only be neutralized to go beyond both mind and matter the end of formations.

    In India, one could still find yogis sitting or lying motionless for months blissfully unaware, the core of the problem is not the body but his ‘Dhamma’ the source of ‘Chitta’ the creator of the elusive ‘I’, which continues to react to the conditions of the outer world unknown to the meditator who in reality is in a state of deep slumber similar to hibernating bears. In this state, all that is evident to him are nothing but creations of his own deluded mind which he incorrectly perceives as ‘profound states’ of the mind.

    Siddhartha for the first time realized and revealed that neutralizing the dualistic thought process is the only way to silence the creator of ‘I’. It is not about achieving anything but going beyond mind and matter.

    In his quest for Deliverance, Siddhartha experienced and mastered all spiritual and ascetic meditation practices such as Jhana, vipassana, metta etc. before realizing none of them had any bearing on the way he was seeking. With this conviction gained from his own experience, he realized the only way out of this world of duality is to face it to experience it to deal with it. Thus, he turned his whole life into a ‘Meditative’ process observing his ‘Chitta’ reacting to conditions of the outer world every moment, with the ‘Mental Factor’ the concomitance - Sila, Samadhi, Wisdom to guide same on the ‘Middle Way’ to go beyond duality. This process is not about sitting or walking but a ‘Living Meditation’ because the life has to be lived to understand it. In Dhamma, the life is just what it is, there is no such thing as a ‘holy life’ or a ‘laymen’s life. Hence the seeker knows in his world there are no monasteries, temples or ‘retreats’ which are creations of the ignorant world of religions. He leads his life as everyone else but remaining constantly aware of his ‘Chitta’ to neutralize it. This “Way’ of Siddhartha is as unique as the ‘Dhamma’ he discovered ‘a something never heard before’. It is the ‘Only Way’ for the ‘Renunciation’ or abandoning of the way of the world of duality, no more birth.

    To seek this unique process, everything the seeker needs can be found within himself. Teachers, preachers, sacred books, Suttas are irrelevant to this way, they are in fact a hindrance, mere creations of religions to ply their trade. Your participation is imperative to their survival. You are their valued customer, without you, they cannot exist. Siddhartha sought his ‘Middle Way’ within, to go beyond and invited the seeker to seek his own. If you fail, your misfortune is someone else’s fortune. The religions are eagerly awaiting to welcome you with open arms. No wonder it is said, ‘FAILURES ARE THE PILLARS OF RELIGIONS’.


    ‘The greatest conquest of them all is the conquest of self’ - Siddhartha.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Mara Pacers's Avatar
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    If you believe the stuff you are posting Bradley, why come to this site? The views expressed by the group of "seekers" and their guru is just about the opposite to what Ajahn Brahm, BSWA and Theravada Buddhists teach. For people unaware of this group, it is useful to know that the guru is not an ordained monk... not part of any Buddhist Sangha.

    This forum is about making the Dhamma accessible for people. So Bradley; What benefit is there for you to keep posting from this group? What benefit is there for members of this forum? How does it bring one closer to the Dhamma? In fact, even though these writings "quote" Siddharta (never any references given) I cannot even classify them as Buddhist as they are often the complete opposite of the words of the Buddha as per authenticated teachings, and the teachings of any of the branches of Buddhism.

    I only respond to you here, because people coming here are looking for information about Buddhism, or wanting deeper knowledge and connection to the Dhamma. Whereas, these excerpts are just reinforcing delusion, wrong understanding, wrong view etc. Just because it is labelled "the word of siddharta" doesn't mean it has the slightest thing to do with Buddhism. In fact I cannot see any single authentic teaching in it at all. It just seems like dishonest speech, pretending it is something it is not.
    Last edited by Mara Pacers; 6th-December-2017 at 06:14 AM.

  3. #3
    Hi Mara, As a seeker, I have no guru and I don't believe in them. A one who goes after others is incapable of of knowing himself. I believe the Dhamma is about my mind and who else could know my mind better than I do. I was once a believer and lost half of my life going after others to no avail and I don't intend to make the same mistake again. This is why I post these article to the forum. Experience the world yourself to understand it, they say. These are words of wisdom. There is simply no other way. I hope you understand. Best regards. Bradley

  4. #4
    Hello Bradly, so, did you type the above i.e you are the author?

  5. #5
    Senior Member Mara Pacers's Avatar
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    Bradley, You have said before that all this stuff is written by Paul Hess. As you prefer to quote his words, than give your own opinions, even getting his responses to questions asked, instead of supplying your own, he is obviously the person who's teachings you follow.

    The more I look into this, the less trustworthy it seems. Especially since this isn't the only internet forum that you post this stuff on (literally word for word).

    At first when you started to come to this site you actually asked questions. Your posts and questions were treated with respect and kindness. You have uniformly rejected the input from members of the forum, as well as by the Venerables who have answered your questions. Now all you do is spout this guys writing, which just clouds and obscures the Buddhas message to us about liberation from suffering in this world. This has been steadily increasing over most of this year.

    All those who visit this forum have a right to know that your statements from Paul Hess are not endorsed as any legitimate Buddhist teaching, and not reflective of the BSWA. Rather, the fact that, in spite of this, you have been welcomed and the Buddha Dhamma being made available to you, is evidence that the BSWA and this forum practice the Noble 8 fold path, and put the Buddhas teachings of loving kindness into practice.

    May all beings be free of suffering

    M

  6. #6
    Thank you Mara....

    Mahisha

  7. #7
    Senior Member Mara Pacers's Avatar
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    Apologies Mahisha, I didn't mean to answer your question on Bradleys behalf. I was responding to his statement that he doesn't follow a guru, when previously he has indicated that he follows the teachings of the author of his posts.

    I just get quite frustrated, trying to sort authenticated Buddhist teachings from all the chaff that floats around the internet. It took me a long time to sort through and to learn enough to know where to put my trust. That is one of the reasons why I choose to be a member of this forum, because of the respect I have for BSWA.

  8. #8
    Hello Mara, oh, I know you didn't mean to!
    But, was and am thankful for what you wrote - as I had a similar thought in mind, but, couldn't articulate properly....

    I really like these forums, and am grateful for the opportunities....

    Mahisha

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    Administrator/ 5 Precept Keeper Senior Member Jerrod Lopes's Avatar
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    In my direct experience, especially as of late, the Siddartha in these articles has nearly always the opposite experience from me. Also knowing that there is one Dhamma with many paths, I can't see a usefulness in this Siddartha's words to a seeker of truth. They are, however, a boon to a seeker of confusion. And if we are following the writings here of the fictional Siddartha by Herman Hess, it makes great sense, as THAT Siddartha was quite confused his entire life. There is a single, ultimate Dhamma that applies to every thing in existence. All conditioned things are impermanent. There is no special version of this for each person. A special, personal Dhamma, is nothing more than another self-building ego-enforcing construct. The sooner one realizes this, the better.

    With metta, malice, kindness, annoyance, a dash of frustration....

  10. #10
    Thank you Jerrod,

    Found the "SIDDHARTHA" that Bradley West is quoting from, finally.
    In the past, I had done a few keyword searches, but didn't bring out anything...
    For some reasons, the author was never mentioned - and on the rare occasion, was left at "Paul Hess". Searching for Herman Hess - that is the key.

    Thank you very much, Mahisha

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siddhartha_(novel)

    Best wishes, Mahisha

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